Is Justin Bieber Illuminati?

This article discusses whether or not Justin Bieber is in the Illuminati and why it doesn’t matter very much.

Mark Dice is a pretty great guy. He studies conspiracy and stuff like that. He notes that Justin Bieber has an owl tattoo, but not just any owl tattoo. It is a particular image of the owl which is also the Bohemian Grove symbol and dates back to Greek mythology. See the video below:

The Illuminati allegedly has a historical grip on the music industry in the US. Records labels and so forth. Because the beebz has a tattoo which is connected with the Bohemian Grove and because he’s straight up dope rich and famous through music it might be plausible to some that he may be connected with the Illuminati, a super-elite and secret organization of people who get together to steer the world and so forth.

Here’s a video more directly addressing the question. In fact, Justin Bieber addresses the question himself!

So Bieber claims he is not in the Illuminati. Maybe this satisfies you and maybe it doesn’t. As a secret organization, the Illuminati may very well train its members to deliberately lie. Even without training, he may want to lie anyway. Does the Illuminati as we understand it even exist anymore? Perhaps he is a secret elite occultist but is not technically in the Illuminati. Or maybe the beebz is telling the truth. Maybe he’s just some rich kid who may or may not even know what his new owl tattoo represents. We can speculate, but on this evidence anyway we really can’t be certain at all that Bieber is in the Illuminati.

Finally, it doesn’t matter. Whether he is formally in it or not he is pushing associated ideas. Whether he knows what his tattoo stands for or not – and he does show some signs of at least limitted understanding – his fans are still going to think it’s the coolest thing and he is therefore supporting the message of the tattoo. Instead of looking so hard at who is in what secret society, or if such secret societies are even extant or powerful themselves, we can realize that a secret society is by definition a bad thing and fairly well expect that whatever membership they have or messages they spread will be less moral ceteris paribus. Given a centralized structure, the effect is compounded as we know that negative personality types are attracted toward these structures. The historical symbolism referencing questionably moral aims and anecdotal, or even somewhat statistical, association with questionably moral individuals is all icing on the cake. The negative points can be shown as institutionally intrinsic, and whether a person is formally affiliated or informally supporting makes little difference.

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